Torrent Tracker List

Torrent Tracker List

List of working Torrent Trackers. Compiled from a variety of sources. Please comment below to add more, or report bad ones.

Http Trackers

http://agusiq-torrents.pl:6969/announce
http://asnet.pw:2710/announce
http://fxtt.ru:80/announce
http://grifon.info:80/announce
http://mgtracker.org:2710/announce
http://mgtracker.org:6969/announce
http://ns349743.ip-91-121-106.eu:80/announce
http://pt.lax.mx:80/announce
http://retracker.bashtel.ru:80/announce
http://retracker.gorcomnet.ru/announce
http://retracker.krs-ix.ru:80/announce
http://retracker.mgts.by:80/announce
http://retracker.spark-rostov.ru:80/announce
http://retracker.telecom.by:80/announce
http://share.camoe.cn:8080/announce
http://t.nyaatracker.com:80/announce
http://thetracker.org:80/announce
http://torrentsmd.eu:8080/announce
http://torrentsmd.me:8080/announce
http://tr.kxmp.cf:80/announce
http://tracker.aletorrenty.pl:2710/announce
http://tracker.baravik.org:6970/announce
http://tracker.bittor.pw:1337/announce
http://tracker.bittorrent.am/announce
http://tracker.calculate.ru:6969/announce
http://tracker.city9x.com:2710/announce
http://tracker.devil-torrents.pl:80/announce
http://tracker.dutchtracking.com:80/announce
http://tracker.dutchtracking.com/announce
http://tracker.dutchtracking.nl:80/announce
http://tracker.dutchtracking.nl/announce
http://tracker.edoardocolombo.eu:6969/announce
http://tracker.electro-torrent.pl:80/announce
http://tracker.ex.ua:80/announce
http://tracker.ex.ua/announce
http://tracker.filetracker.pl:8089/announce
http://tracker.flashtorrents.org:6969/announce
http://tracker.grepler.com:6969/announce
http://tracker.internetwarriors.net:1337/announce
http://tracker.kicks-ass.net:80/announce
http://tracker.kicks-ass.net/announce
http://tracker.mg64.net:6881/announce
http://tracker.opentrackr.org:1337/announce
http://tracker.tfile.co:80/announce
http://tracker.tfile.me:80/announce
http://tracker.tfile.me/announce
http://tracker.tiny-vps.com:6969/announce
http://tracker.tvunderground.org.ru:3218/announce
http://tracker.yoshi210.com:6969/announce
http://tracker1.wasabii.com.tw:6969/announce
http://tracker2.itzmx.com:6961/announce
http://tracker2.wasabii.com.tw:6969/announce
http://www.wareztorrent.com:80/announce

Https Trackers

https://open.kickasstracker.com:443/announce
https://tracker.bt-hash.com:443/announce

UDP Trackers

udp://bt.aoeex.com:8000/announce
udp://bt.xxx-tracker.com:2710/announce
udp://bt.xxx-tracker.com:2710/announce
udp://explodie.org:6969
udp://inferno.demonoid.pw:3418/announce
udp://mgtracker.org:2710/announce
udp://open.stealth.si:80/announce
udp://peerfect.org:6969/announce
udp://public.popcorn-tracker.org:6969/announce
udp://retracker.lanta-net.ru:2710/announce
udp://retracker.nts.su:2710/announce
udp://santost12.xyz:6969/announce
udp://tc.animereactor.ru:8082/announce
udp://thetracker.org:80/announce
udp://tracker.aletorrenty.pl:2710/announce
udp://tracker.aletorrenty.pl:2710/announce
udp://tracker.bittor.pw:1337/announce
udp://tracker.bittor.pw:1337/announce
udp://tracker.coppersurfer.tk:6969/announce
udp://tracker.coppersurfer.tk:6969/announce
udp://tracker.cyberia.is:6969/announce
udp://tracker.cypherpunks.ru:6969/announce
udp://tracker.doko.moe:6969/announce
udp://tracker.dutchtracking.com:6969/announce
udp://tracker.eddie4.nl:6969/announce
udp://tracker.ex.ua:80/announce
udp://tracker.filetracker.pl:8089/announce
udp://tracker.flashtorrents.org:6969/announce
udp://tracker.flashtorrents.org:6969/announce
udp://tracker.grepler.com:6969/announce
udp://tracker.grepler.com:6969/announce
udp://tracker.halfchub.club:6969/announce
udp://tracker.ilibr.org:80/announce
udp://tracker.internetwarriors.net:1337/announce
udp://tracker.internetwarriors.net:1337/announce
udp://tracker.justseed.it:1337/announce
udp://tracker.kicks-ass.net:80/announce
udp://tracker.kicks-ass.net:80/announce
udp://tracker.kuroy.me:5944/announce
udp://tracker.leechers-paradise.org:6969/announce
udp://tracker.mg64.net:2710/announce
udp://tracker.mg64.net:6969/announce
udp://tracker.opentrackr.org:1337/announce
udp://tracker.sktorrent.net:6969
udp://tracker.sktorrent.net:6969/announce
udp://tracker.sktorrent.net:6969/announce
udp://tracker.sktorrent.net:6969/announce
udp://tracker.skyts.net:6969/announce
udp://tracker.swateam.org.uk:2710/announce
udp://tracker.tiny-vps.com:6969/announce
udp://tracker.tiny-vps.com:6969/announce
udp://tracker.torrent.eu.org:451/announce
udp://tracker.tvunderground.org.ru:3218/announce
udp://tracker.vanitycore.co:6969/announce
udp://tracker.vanitycore.co:6969/announce
udp://tracker.yoshi210.com:6969/announce
udp://tracker2.christianbro.pw:6969/announce
udp://tracker2.indowebster.com:6969/announce
udp://tracker4.piratux.com:6969/announce
udp://ulfbrueggemann.no-ip.org:6969/announce
udp://wambo.club:1337/announce
udp://zephir.monocul.us:6969/announce

RPG Locations: The Dorothea Hotel

RPG Locations: The Dorothea Hotel

The Dorothea Hotel is meant to be an RPG location for RPG games in the modern and horror genres. It can also work in Ghostbusters, Steampunk genres, and Weird World games. Or any game that needs a location full of occult lore, mystery, horror and hauntings.

History

Using his family fortune, Commodore Philoman Cole started construction on the hotel in 1829. He envisioned a grand building worthy of European Royalty, specifically his friend Princess Sophie of Bavaria. The vision of his hotel was wildly publicized in New York papers and was soon mentioned around the world. Sparing no expense, and using all the latest technologies and building techniques of the day it was completed in 1831.

VIP guests from the world were invited to attend the inaugural opening. Among them Princess Sophie of Bavaria and President Andrew Jackson. By all accounts the opening was a success. The Dorothea Hotel was mentioned in the same sentences as the great hotels in not only New York but around the world. Reservations were being made years in advance. Buoyed by the art of some of the finest cooks in the United States at the time, the Dining room and ballroom both became hubs for the rich, famous and influential to be seen at. Newspaper men, authors, poets and various hanger ons would congregate in the lobby to watch the comings and goings of the influential and perhaps gather a bit of news to write about.

Unfortunately tragedy quickly struck the hotel. Unexplained disappearances of guests at the hotel immediately plagued its reputation. Most attributed the disappearances as merely those trying to escape creditors and the stories immediately dismissed. But muckrakers among the ever present press corps could not let the stories go, and stories of the grand hotel circulated among the lower classes.

An unexplained fire in 1835 that took the life of the wife and daughter of an investing owner in the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Rumors of murder, insurance fraud, and shoddy workmanship were all floated about. The uproar and promises of investigation into the management of the hotel were front page news for weeks. Investigations by private detectives uncovered the remains of an incendiary device in the damaged hotel room, which in turn triggered more rumors and front page news.

A mere two years later, news of “The Midnight Murders” became the talk of the town. The dismembered bodies of young boys were found scattered around the neighborhood over the period of a single month. One of the victims was an employee at the Hotel. A through search of the building for the missing boy finally revealed mass murderer Cornelius Hunt in the middle of the gristly act. Hunt later revealed in his confession that he needed the blood of thirteen strong but innocent boys to complete a dark ritual meant to make himself immortal.

The newspapers of course had a field day with that story, and despite the Commodores best efforts, the reputation of the hotel seemed to be permanently tarnished. To make matters worse, residents and employees started reporting strange activities in the hotel. Most were merely mischievous noises and objects randomly moving around. But the Russian Ambassador reported the definite feeling of hands shoving him just before he tumbled down the main stairs.

At the behest of friends, and an attempt to “clean” the hotel of spirits and return it to its former glory, Commodore Cole became interested in the Spiritualism movement in 1841

After the death of his father, and his own return from fighting in the Civil War, William Cole came back to take over ownership of the hotel. Between the rumored hauntings of the hotel, and his own experiences in the building and on the battlefield, William became interested in the occult. By 1868 as home to the Chimercial Sanctuary of the Forbidden Lexicon, The Dorothea Hotel had become one of the centers of Occult studies in the United States.

Founded the year before, by William Cole and his compatriots, the Chimercial Sanctuary of the Forbidden Lexicon became one of the premier Occult societies around the world. The

Rewired for electric in 1890s

Remodeled into apartments in the 1930s

Description

The Dorothea Hotel is a Gothic Revival building tucked away on what is now a dead end alley just a few blocks away from Central Park in New York City. The building looks worn and dilapidated, but still maintains an air of faded elegance. If the game settings calls for it, the building could easily have a feeling of menace if needed.

While it maintains the name, the hotel is actually now an apartment building. The original rooms were combined and remodeled into a variety of residences with individual plumbing and utilities added. They still maintained their original high class grandeur, although like rest of the building they feel old and worn.

Once famously written about in newspapers, the hotel has managed to avoid redevelopment over the decades.The main thoroughfare past the hotel was closed off in 1901 and development of nearby properties further reduced the road width until it was only an alley way wide enough for wagons and the first automobiles to access. The alley way is still paved with good quality cobblestone although it is mostly filled with trash and recycling containers.

The six story building is festooned with turrets and gargoyle statues. Combined with sturdy stone walls of expensively mined stone from New Hampshire they give the hotel the look of a Medieval Fortress. An imposing, by Victorian standards, front entrance still dominates the hotel although its glory is hidden by nearby buildings built close. The copper roof is long green with age. Ground and second floor windows are ornate stained glass, while the upper floors are expensively glazed glass.

Inside the main entrance is an exquisitely tiled floor depicting the Bavarian Crest in once inch black and white tiles. The 15 foot tall walls are lined with mahogany paneling and ornate brass gas fixtures transformed to electric in the mid 1890s. The room is still adorned with art from famous artists. Large paintings by masters are on each wall. Sculptures of marble and brass each sit in their own alcoves. The largest chandelier made of Tiffany Crystal hangs from the ceiling. It was rewired for electricity by the company at the same time as the rest of the building.

A large reception desk sits between two large columns, both made of mahogany also. Behind the desk and to one side are individually labeled mail slots. Spaced around the room are antique chairs, sofas and tables for hotel guests. All show signs of wear and long use but are in good shape. Two huge marble stair cases lead to the second floor balconies on each side of the lobby.

Behind the front desk is employee access to kitchens, offices and storage. To the left and behind two more sets of mahogany doors, is a huge library that extends upwards three stories. Floor to ceiling book shelves line each level and are accessible by ornate wrought iron stairways and rolling ladders to reach the upper shelves. Like the lobby, the library has reading nooks filled with worn antique furniture and bronze light fixtures.

To the right of the lobby is a formal dining room. In its heyday the room also acted as a ball room, reception hall, theater or meeting room. The walls hang with large red velvet curtains and there is a raised stage at one end. Concealed storage areas hide the chairs, tables, and furniture needed to configure the room as needed.

A set of retrofitted elevators that access the basement, first, second, third and fourth floors are to the left of the entrance. Each is equipped with custom made ornate brass gates and a lever that controls the floor. Like everything else in the building, they are obviously old and worn, but appear to be well maintained.

Second Floor

A balcony lines the lobby at the second floor, providing discrete views of the lobby and its visitors. There is access to the second floor of the library on the left side. To the right is another large ball room space that was modified into a moving picture theater in the late 1920s. Like the first floor lobby, all the hallways and public areas are lined with mahogany wood paneling, bronze lighting fixtures, and art by famous painters and sculptures.

The crowning piece of this collection is an 10 foot wide by 6 foot high painting of three ships in battle. Two of the ships are Spanish Galleons, the other a smaller merchant ship with pirate flag flying obviously getting the better of the galleons. The ships are fighting in heavy seas, and it is wildly historically inaccurate. It was an opening day gift to the hotel, commissioned from painter David Wilkie, by Archduke Franz Karl of Austria.

The elevators and granite stairs both continue up to the third floor. The floors are the same granite as the stairways, white, with a black granite around the edges.

Third Floor

On the third floor is another level of access to the library. Like the second floor, the hallways are granite floors and mahogany walls lined with art. Most of it by lesser known painters but still exquisite in their own way. To the left is access to the hotels original Empress Suite and Presidential Suite, reserved for important guests and named after their first inhabitants at the grand opening. The Empress Suite is named after Princess Sophie of Bavaria, while the Presidential Suite has named for President Andrew Jackson.

Like the rest of the rooms in the hotel, both suites are now private multi-room residences. Each has a separate grand kitchen, a master bedroom with a walk in closet and private bath. Two more bedrooms that share a bathroom, and a central sitting room with a dining area between it and the kitchen.

Fourth, fifth and sixth Floors

The original fourth, fifth and sixth floors each had between eight and sixteen rooms. Shared bathrooms and shower facilities were at each side of the building. After the remodel, the fourth floor has four two bedroom apartments. The fifth and sixth floors each have ten one bedroom apartments. The shared bathrooms and shower spaces are now laundry rooms and storage.

Basement

The original basement was accessed by stairs in the office space behind the reception desk. It included an extensive wine cellar once known for being the best in the City. An huge coal fired furnace dominated the space. When built, the coal storage was boasted as being the largest and most modern in the city. The furnace itself was a modified blast furnace originally designed for the metallurgy industry. It was the first effective central heating in the city.

Attic

The attic space consisted of a number of small apartments. Senior employees would have their families living here, while maids and maintenance people would share rooms with each other. All rooms had hideaway beds that rolled into the walls to provide more living space. A separate narrow stairway for servant use descends all the way to the basement. At each floor is a discrete door to maintain privacy for the residents.

These rooms were not part of the remodel. Today they are mostly storage spaces, holding the possessions of past and present residents.

Library

At its conception, the library was meant to be one of the most complete historical archives in the United States. At the behest of Princess Sophie, Archduke Franz Karl provided copies of every historical document and book in his own Royal library to help start the collection. Commodore Cole contributed his own families extensive collection of historical texts and created a rather large endowment to copy tomes missing in the collection directly from the Library of Congress. That effort continued on until fire in 1851 destroyed a major portion of the Library of Congress when the endowment was reversed to donate missing texts back to the Library.

After the American Civil War, the librarian was instructed to start collecting and cataloging Spiritualist and Occult literature. With the prevalence of the movement, and the Hotel’s growing role at the center of the movement in New York’s high society, the collection grew by leaps and bounds. Members of Chimercial Sanctuary of the Forbidden Lexicon from around the world would send in copies of texts to be cataloged and stored at The Dorothea. Spiritualist authors who wished to lecture at the hotel were instructed to provide a copy of their works for archival and research.

William Cole got involved in the spiritualist movement instructed his librarian the rise in Occultism across the United States, a

Dining Room

The dining room

200 diners

Ball Room/Movie Theater

Residents

Commodore Philman Cole

Librarian

Granfather Cole

Wren Sisters

Professor Anders

Game Options

The Hotel is inhabited and staffed by ghosts. While some are trapped here, most simply continue on as they did in life.

The hotel, while well written about, is a mystery. People only find it if they need it, or can see between dimensions.

RPG Stuff – Cole Family History

RPG Stuff – Cole Family History

History of the Cole Family, an New England family rife with hauntings and bad luck. From 1500-2100

—————–

In the 1500s, the patriarch of what would become the Cole family was a Spanish born pirate working under a Letter of Marque for England. Bartolome Gómez, sailing a converted merchantman, the La Galga, would fly under the Spanish Flag to take over Spanish Treasure Galleons. He would usually flag the captain of the Galleon down by pretending to have dispatches from Madrid for the Captain. Once aboard, his men would quickly capture the Galleon, kill the remaining crew and sail the ship to England.

Unfortunately he was in Plymouth England at the time Spain attempted to invade the island nation. Pressed into service by the Admiralty, under the command of Captain Gómez, the La Galga acquitted herself quite well. Two Spanish ships were sunk at the same time. Over the next two days it would help to sink three more ships, and even came to the aid of Sir Francis Drake himself by drawing fire away so that Drake’s ship could maneuver into a better position. For his actions, Gómez was awarded a Knighthood and a Charter to found a colony in North America.

Unfortunately Bartolome Gómez died before he could outfit the Colony expedition. His son, Tomé Gómez inherited the charter, title, and most importantly his father’s ill gained fortune. By 1620, he had changed his name to Thomas Cole to attract additional English investors in the colony. He managed to build a small fleet of three merchant ships and 400 colonists. They sailed to Virginia and founded a colony near what is today Salem Massachusetts in November of 1623. The winter killed over half the English colonists due to exposure and starvation.

In the early spring of 1624, Gómez, now Cole, seeing the colony needed more man power to clear land and build farms decided to sail to Africa. His goal was to purchase slaves and bring them back to do the back breaking work while the English colonists searched for Gold and other exploitable minerals. Unfortunately by the time he returned, the colony had all but disappeared. With a ship hold full of slaves, he sailed south to Virginia and sold them there.

After six more voyages, and styling himself “Commodore,” Thomas Cole had amassed a fleet of seven ships. Three ran the slave trade while the rest traded up and down the coast of New England and Britain. Like his father, he also engaged in piracy. He would outfit and fund the voyages of other captains, sold the stolen goods from these voyages by inserting them into his legitimate mercantile business, and took half the profits. By 1650 the Commodore was one of the richest men in North America.

Tired of the weather in Virginia, and at the suggestion of his wife, Amice, Thomas turned his eyes back to the nascent colony in Massachusetts. A large house and farm was built there by slave labor and the family moved in 1655. Thomas died the same year from pneumonia, having lived in house less than a month. His wife Amice, with the help of a slave woman named Constance raised his twin daughters Anne and Lora but sold the merchant business.

Some say that due to his wretched life, Thomas Cole could not move on. He would be known to haunt the house and farm. Any suitors attempting to marry his wife to get their hands on his fortune would eventually be found dead from unknown causes. After six such attempts, eyes turned from Amice to her beautiful daughters. No longer the center of attention, and half insane from the unexplained deaths and continued hauntings, Amice threw herself off a nearby cliff in 1671.

At sixteen years old, the daughters Anne and Lora were left with a sizable fortune and even more suitors. The hauntings at the house because even worse over the next decade with thirteen suitors dead under mysterious circumstances. Out of desperation, their enslaved servant Constance proposed a VooDoo ceremony to cleanse the house. The daughters agreed and it appeared to be successful. Buoyed by that success, both women took an interest in the occult and magic to the determent of all other activities.

Attracted by the Cole Sisters’ wealth, and hearing rumors of their interest, both charlatans and real practicers of witch craft and magic schemed to get their hands on it. The Sisters eventually both fell for a charming man named Elbert Hubbard who promised to teach them “sex magic”. His betrayal of them both and the fight between the sisters eventually led to both being accused of witch craft at the start of the Salem Witch Trials. Their house was burned, the fields salted, and the slaves escaped to freedom.

Lora, pregnant with Hubbard’s child, was smuggled away by the Constance’s own son Lucian. Anne unfortunately was caught, put on trial and sentenced to hang. Before doing so though, she uttered a curse upon her sister and her offspring that the family would be met with nothing but tragedy.

Lora died in a difficult child birth. Lucian named the boy Raymond and raised him in a small cabin in the woods. They lived as farmers. Lucien would trade his labor get the boy schooled. Raymond would go on to teach himself to read from a Bible owned by his grandfather Thomas Cole. At the age of thirteen, Raymond realized that the Bible contained a cipher. It took him nearly three years to decode it, but found instructions to a hidden cache of gold buried by Thomas in Pirate tradition. With the help of Lucien they returned to Salem, followed the map and managed to dig up a substantial amount of gold, silver and jewelry.

Based on the stories about his grandfather, Raymond and Lucien then traveled to the capital in New York City and started a mercantile business. Raymond took his first ocean voyage across the Atlantic to buy goods. Lucien was tasked with building a warehouse and store front. Together they ran the business, Lucien would manage day to day operations of the store and Raymond would eventually buy his own ship and provide goods. Raymond officially gave Lucien his freedom and in gratitude, Lucien took on the Cole name and pledged an oath to look after the Cole family.

By 1740, the Cole Family Mercantile had expanded to seven locations across New England. Lucien had died a year earlier, but his own sons each managed one of the locations. Raymond Cole amassed a fleet of three ships plying the trade routes. Needing a substantial amount of money, he sold the merchant portion of the business to Lucien’s sons and sat down to marry into Society. His eyes upon the daughter of an alderman named Rebecca.

The two soon married and had a son named Alden. In 1745, the family curse reared its head. Raymond and Rebecca perished in a carriage accident. The four year old Alden was left in the care of another of Lucien’s offspring, grandson Silas. Silas Cole had been engaged as a butler by Raymond Cole and took over the duties of raising Alden in the family tradition. In addition to his duties as caretaker, he continued to run the Cole family merchant ships and even remerged the split business back into a single entity by buying out his uncles’ stores.

Alden Cole, growing up in the great merchant family, of course became a Captain of one of the ships early on. At the age of thirty he foresaw a rich future in supporting the American Revolution. The Cole Family pushed for independence, helped to finance the revolution, procured needed supplies for the Continental Army and acted as Privateers attacking British merchants and stealing their goods. At the end of the war, Alden Cole turned his eyes towards China and the profits to be found in the Orient.

Naming himself Commodore Cole he led a fleet of ships into the Beaver for and Opium Trade. In 1790 his own son, Philoman Cole joined the family business. Looking to make his own mark on the family business, he moved to Paris where he made contacts among the nobility and acted as a go between for the American politicians and society. Seeing the French Revolution about to unfold, he traveled to Bavaria to see what connections could be made there. This is where he met and befriended the young Princess Sophie. The Princess was enamored of this American who’s family had made their riches again and again.

On his last voyage before retirement, Alden Cole’s ship was lost at sea. Upon receiving the news, Philoman returned to New York and took over the family business, bringing it to even more prosperity with his new European connections. The hotel suffered several set backs though. Unexplained deaths, murders, and the death of the Commodores’ wife soon after childbirth

——–

Using his family fortune, Commodore Philoman Cole started construction on the hotel in 1829. He envisioned a grand building worthy of European Royalty, specifically his friend Princess Sophie of Bavaria. The vision of his hotel was wildly publicized in New York papers and was soon mentioned around the world. Sparing no expense, and using all the latest technologies and building techniques of the day it was completed in 1831.

VIP guests from the world were invited to attend the inaugural opening. Among them Princess Sophie of Bavaria and President Andrew Jackson. By all accounts the opening was a success. The Dorothea Hotel was mentioned in the same sentences as the great hotels in not only New York but around the world. Reservations were being made years in advance. Buoyed by the art of some of the finest cooks in the United States at the time, the Dining room and ballroom both became hubs for the rich, famous and influential to be seen at. Newspaper men, authors, poets and various hanger ons would congregate in the lobby to watch the comings and goings of the influential and perhaps gather a bit of news to write about.

Unfortunately tragedy quickly struck the hotel. Unexplained disappearances of guests at the hotel immediately plagued its reputation. Most attributed the disappearances as merely those trying to escape creditors and the stories immediately dismissed. But muckrakers among the ever present press corps could not let the stories go, and stories of the grand hotel circulated among the lower classes.

An unexplained fire in 1835 that took the life of the wife and daughter of an investing owner in the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Rumors of murder, insurance fraud, and shoddy workmanship were all floated about. The uproar and promises of investigation into the management of the hotel were front page news for weeks. Investigations by private detectives uncovered the remains of an incendiary device in the damaged hotel room, which in turn triggered more rumors and front page news.

A mere two years later, news of “The Midnight Murders” became the talk of the town. The dismembered bodies of young boys were found scattered around the neighborhood over the period of a single month. One of the victims was an employee at the Hotel. A through search of the building for the missing boy finally revealed mass murderer Cornelius Hunt in the middle of the gristly act. Hunt later revealed in his confession that he needed the blood of thirteen strong but innocent boys to complete a dark ritual meant to make himself immortal.

The newspapers of course had a field day with that story, and despite the Commodores best efforts, the reputation of the hotel seemed to be permanently tarnished. To make matters worse, residents and employees started reporting strange activities in the hotel. Most were merely mischievous noises and objects randomly moving around. But the Russian Ambassador reported the definite feeling of hands shoving him just before he tumbled down the main stairs.

After the reputation hit the Commodore moved into the hotel with his new bride, Amelia, in an attempt to show the hotel had no curse. Unfortunately, shortly after giving birth, Amelia Cole died from complications of the birth. The baby boy, William, soon became a favorite of the hotel staff and guests. All, including his father doted upon him. But by the age of four years old his caretakers repeatedly reported that young William had

No Man’s Sky Access Codes

No Man’s Sky Access Codes

No Man’s Sky is an open world exploration game available on the Xbox, Playstation and Windows platforms. All credit goes to Taygete on the Steam Community Forums.

These access codes for No Man’s Sky are needed at Observatories and Transmission Towers. This includes locations that are taken over by biological horrors. Codes inputted at observatories usually lead to the ruins points of interest.

Codes put in at Transmission Towers reveal distress signals of crashed freights and crashed ships.

All these codes seem to be mathematical equations. For those of us who don’t always see the patterns involved, (or may not have had the required math classes,) here they are! The bolded digits should be the answer to the puzzle.

Sum of Contiguous Numbers


1-3-4-7-11-18-29
1-5-3-7-5-9-7
1-2-6-24-120-720
2-4-12-48-240-1440
3-5-8-13-21-34

Exponents and Factors


5-14-41-122-365
17-33-65-129-257
23-45-89-177-353
56-59-63-68-74-81
80-71-63-56-50
99-92-86-81-77
5040-720-120-24-6

4 Digit Patterns


1027-7101-2710-0271
1126-6112-2611-1261
1181-1118-8111-1811
1212-2121-1212-2121
1265-5126-6512-2651
1345-5134-4513-3451
1702-7021-0217-2170
1737-7173-3717-7371
2109-1092-0921-9210
2230-0223-3022-2302
2379-9237-7923-3792
2595-5259-9525-5952
2738-7382-3827-8273
3382-2338-8233-3823
3908-9083-0839-8390
3941-9413-4139-1394
3987-9873-8739-7398
4416-6141-1641-4164
4366-3664-6643-6436
4634-6344-3446-4463
4865-8654-6548-5486
5047-7504-4750-0475
5336-3365-3653-6533
5493-3549-9354-4935
5571-1557-7155-5715
5920-9205-2059-0592
6543-3654-4365-5436
6618-8661-1866-6186
7354-3547-5473-4735
7771-1777-7177-7717
8104-4810-0481-1048
8432-2843-3284-4328
8653-3865-5386-6538
9162-1629-6291-2916
9183-1839-8391-3918
9214-4921-1492-2149
9780-7809-8097-0978
9854-4985-5498-8549

If you know of any that are missing, or have any corrects, please comment below!