How To Fix: H4ck3d by R3d Dr4GoN

How To Fix: H4ck3d by R3d Dr4GoN

This happened to me on both of my WordPress blogs, this one, and Pacific Northwest Photoblog. This could happen to any site though, not just WordPress sites.

How To Fix: H4ck3d by R3d Dr4GoN

First off, do not panic.

Either way clearing this up is pretty easy. In both cases there was a 301 Redirect in my .htaccess file on the very first line. I removed this and was able to get to sub pages. The main page continued to be a problem though. Looking closer I found that I had an index.php and index.html page. Since WordPress renders completely in PHP, the presence of Index.html was a bit strange. Taking a look at it I found:

HTML>

H4ck3d By R3d Dr4GoN






This Site Is

Very clearly this is incorrect. So I renamed Index.html to Index.hack, refreshed my main and everything was back to normal! After this be sure to change the password to your terminal/ftp user, create new SSH keys or create new ones if you don’t have any, and just to be safe, change your WordPress blog admin password.

While the actual hack was pretty amateurish, and was likely done by a script that exploited known security issues, it shows just how important proper security is in this day and age. And more importantly, it shows that no matter what you know, and how much you prepare – you will get hacked someday.

“Can’t Upload Image, directory missing” in WordPress

“Can’t Upload Image, directory missing” in WordPress

“Can’t Upload Image, directory missing” message comes up in WordPress when the uploads directory is missing. In older versions of WordPress, or in a one click install from a company such as DreamHost, the entire path was coded into the WordPress settings.

To fix in WP versions below 3.0:
1.) Login to Admin Control Panel
2.) Go to Settings
3.) Go to Miscellaneous
4.) Change the field: “Store uploads in this folder” to the short, correct path: wp-content/uploads

To fix in WP versions 3.0 and above:
1.) Login to Admin Control Panel
2.) Go to Settings
3.) Go to Media
4.) Change the field: “Store uploads in this folder” to the short, correct path: wp-content/uploads

OSX 10.5.7 Update Issues

OSX 10.5.7 Update Issues

It’s comforting to know that when Apple screws up, they do it but good.

Not since the days of Tiger has a dot release from Apple done so much damage. On the surface, 10.5.7 is a very important update. A lists of fixes includes the usual round of security fixes, fixes for network performance, updates for Camera RAW support, among several other fixes. But, initially the Software Update version was throwing up errors “digital signature for the package is incorrect.” Apple rapidly fixed this but it underscores the importance of having good backups and a clean file system.

Afterwards, others started reporting BSOD or Blue Screens of Death after the update was done. Having originated on Windows, the BSOD is now available in Leopard, a nice, if unintended bonus from Apple.

Luckily this problem seems to be fairly easy to fix:

  • Wait for Hard drive access to stop
  • Hold Power button down until computer shuts off
  • Hold shift button down and power computer on to boot into safe mode
  • Use regular user name and password to login if asked
  • type reboot to reboot the computer
  • The next issue to commonly pop up is messed up display resolutions for non-Apple monitors. People are finding themselves stuck in 1920×1080! Resetting the PRAM (Hold down the Command, Option P and K keys while booting until it chimes three or four times) seems to fix for some.

    For some of us REALLY unluckily people, the update gets stuck part way. After letting it sit for an hour at 33% there was no choice but to reboot the computer. Upon booting back up, OS X is not able to fully boot up. In one machine I was able to fix by going into safe mode, then issuing the softwareupdate -l -a command to finish the download and install.

    On my Macbook, it was a full reinstall.

    How To: Fix Desktop Switching

    How To: Fix Desktop Switching

    One of the bugs introduced in Leopard is pretty small, but significant to those of us who highly enjoy our Apple Experience. If Aperture is installed, users are no longer able to change which folder pictures are pulled out of for Desktop Switching. Adding a new folder will show a second, inaccessible “Aperture” folder.

    Various troubleshooting steps included removing Aperture, and removing ~/Library/Preferences/com.apple.desktop.plist which is the file that controls the desktop settings. Neither of these worked though.

    The fix is pretty simple and amazing really. Open iPhoto. Create a new, blank library. Close iPhoto. Go into Desktop Settings and feel free to add as many folders and you wish. In fact it may already be there if you had  dual Aperture folders before.

    After that, simply sit back and enjoy your auto-rotating desktop picture again.

    How to fix: “10.4.11 Broke my Mac!”

    How to fix: “10.4.11 Broke my Mac!”

    A lot of people have been complaining that the 10.4.11 Software update broke their Mac, especially those running bootcamp.

    Users experienced problems such as Blue Screens when the login screen was expected, a screen that switched between a black and a blue one, or simply the mac whirly-thingy is sticking. A lot of people have ended up simply reinstalling the system.

    A bit of Googling brought me to this post about 10.4.9 doing the same thing. The author claims it is because the system got interrupted while it was pre-binding after the install was done. I encountered the problem on several machines that had been forced to run software update via Apple Remote Desktop and all upgraded to 10.4.11. Nobody was actually using the machines, but it’s possible they were running processes while prebinding was happening.

    So from terminal on each affected machine I ran: sudo /usr/bin/update_prebinding -root / -force -debug

    And now each machine boots happily!